Award Date

1-1-2001

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Hotel Administration

First Committee Member

Cynthia Carruthers

Number of Pages

134

Abstract

Intergenerational programs have been found to benefit both the youths and elders who participate in them. Successful programs that serve youth are dependent on obtaining sufficient older adult volunteers. However, program directors report a shortage of older volunteers, despite various recruitment methods. Understanding the motivations of older adults who volunteer for intergenerational programs may help recruiters more effectively secure additional elderly volunteers, and provide optimal volunteer experiences. Qualitative methods were used to study nineteen elderly volunteers who provide service to youth programs or projects. Results found that these elders wanted to contribute to the lives of youth, feel connected to others, including their grandchildren, through their volunteerism, and experience the energy, affection, challenge and joy of being with children. They also volunteered to decrease loneliness, apply pre-retirement skills, and learn about contemporary youth. Intergenerational program managers that can satisfy the motivational functions sought by volunteers may reap higher retention rates.

Keywords

Elders; Intergenerational; Motivation; Program; Volunteer; Youth

Controlled Subject

Recreation; Gerontology; Public policy

File Format

pdf

File Size

3962.88 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/k1by-hhw6


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