Award Date

1-1-2001

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Economics

First Committee Member

James E. Davis

Number of Pages

154

Abstract

Many issues affecting economic education remain unresolved within the profession. Much scholarly attention in recent years relates to the teaching of college introductory economics principles in courses. This thesis analyzes the learning outcomes of students taking introductory college economics principles courses. Little basic research has been performed on the assessment of how students actually learn the concepts of economics. This thesis takes a unique approach to the assessment of learning outcomes. Following a pre- and post-test survey, students were scored on the basis of both their economic attitude sophistication, and their knowledge of content. The results were regressed against a set of demographic characteristics that may predict positive learning outcomes. The results indicate that there are factors that contribute to successful learning outcomes. The conclusion identifies recommendations that can assist in helping students more readily grasp principles of economics.

Keywords

Assessing; Case; College; Courses; Economic; Introductory; Learning; Outcomes; Study

Controlled Subject

Economics; Curriculum planning; Social work education

File Format

pdf

File Size

3409.92 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/ttxr-tohb


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