Award Date

1-1-1990

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

English

Number of Pages

90

Abstract

Imitation, a specific program of writing instruction, offers students the benefits of a discourse community that stretches from Aristotle to Stephen King The arrangement of imitation in a taxonomy directs students through specific steps toward the goal of originality. This taxonomy employs textual models, such as the progymnasmata, and the living model, the writing teacher, writing. To use imitation most successfully, the teacher should understand the rhetorical theory to which she subscribes. Imitation enhances the objective, the transactional and the epistemic theories, but the subjective rhetoric is so dependent on individual inspiration that imitation becomes nearly useless. The regular practice of imitation in the classroom teaches modern students composition techniques, awakens them to the legacy left by earlier writers and introduces them to specific discourse communities.

Keywords

Art; Classical; Composition; Imitation; Modern

Controlled Subject

Language arts

File Format

pdf

File Size

3358.72 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/go0u-76f3


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