Award Date

1-1-2001

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

First Committee Member

Christopher A. Kearney

Number of Pages

95

Abstract

This study examined mediating factors that lead to, or buffer against, development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after child maltreatment. Fifty-five children aged 8--17 years voluntarily completed self-report questionnaires and a structured diagnostic interview. It was hypothesized that (1) chronicity and severity of abuse amplify PTSD risk when a child has limited support networks, ineffective coping, external locus of control, affect dysregulation, and a dysfunctional family; (2) key family and victim characteristics would help to ameliorate effects of traumatic abuse; (3) the combination of precipitating and prophylactic factors would determine the effectiveness of managing traumatic maltreatment. Results suggest that dysthymia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and religion are strong predictors of PTSD in maltreated children. Additionally, as duration of abuse increased, comorbidity increased, particularly for depression, generalized anxiety and phobias. Hypotheses were not supported for coping skills, locus of control, resilience/hardiness, affect regulation, or support networks.

Keywords

Children; Contributing; Disorder; Factors; Maltreated; Posttraumatic; Precipitating; Prophylactic; Stress; Symptomatology

Controlled Subject

Clinical psychology

File Format

pdf

File Size

2836.48 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/uc9s-y3ji


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