Award Date

1-1-2001

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Anthropology

First Committee Member

Frank E. (Ted) Goebel

Number of Pages

97

Abstract

Archaeological excavations and geological trenching at Burnt Rock Spring Mound, 26CK3601, in the northern Mojave Desert has revealed a complex relationship between paleohydrogeology and the prehistoric human use of the site. Multiple formation, accumulation, and deflation episodes since the Late Pleistocene and Holocene correlate with regional climatic models. The mound is located on the northwest periphery of the known extent of Ancestral Puebloan and Patayan peoples. Artifacts, especially micro-debitage, recovered from Late Holocene mound deposits suggest long-term use of this vital resource by Late Archaic and Ceramic peoples.

Keywords

Archaic; Burnt; Ceramics; Human; Late; Mojave; Mound; Nevada; Northern; Nevada; Period; Rock; Spring

Controlled Subject

Archaeology; Indians of North America--Study and teaching

File Format

pdf

File Size

2979.84 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

If you are the rightful copyright holder of this dissertation or thesis and wish to have the full text removed from Digital Scholarship@UNLV, please submit a request to digitalscholarship@unlv.edu and include clear identification of the work, preferably with URL.

Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/ptq1-8ldn


Share

COinS