Award Date

1-1-2001

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Anthropology

First Committee Member

Vicki Cassman

Number of Pages

186

Abstract

Excavations at 42Ws126, a Virgin Anasazi site in Zion National Park, Utah, were conducted for three weeks in the summer of 2000 by archaeologists from the Desert Research Institute in Las Vegas, Nevada, along with high school students and teachers from Nevada and southern Utah as part of a public outreach program. The site consists of aboveground and subsurface storage units and hearth features; no evidence for habitation was encountered. The architecture, ceramic, lithic, and ground stone assemblages indicate small-scale, short-term use of the site. Radiocarbon dates from charred material, the presence of both early and later ceramic types, and the architectural arrangement and construction methods indicate use during Pueblo I (A.D. 800--1000) and late Pueblo II to early Pueblo III periods (A.D. 1000--1150). A model for public interpretation of 42Ws126, which includes designs for wayside signs and a brochure, is proposed.

Keywords

Excavation; Interpretation; National; Park; Site; Utah; Watchman; Zion

Controlled Subject

Archaeology; Indians of North America--Study and teaching

File Format

pdf

File Size

4669.44 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/aswx-y8yq


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