Award Date

1-1-2002

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Education (MEd)

Department

Health and Physical Education

First Committee Member

Charles Regin

Number of Pages

69

Abstract

This research study investigated whether college students' epistemological beliefs (i.e. certain knowledge, simple knowledge, fixed ability, quick learning, and omniscient authority) could predict negative stressors and/or reactions to stress in their college experience. Based on responses to two self-assessment inventories and a demographic survey; analysis of the data suggests that over and above contributions from demographics (i.e. gender, ethnicity, age, and education level), certain dimensions of epistemological beliefs contributed significantly to the prediction of negative stress in college students. This suggests that it is essential for educators to provide opportunities for students' epistemological development; specifically, in the area of constructing knowledge. Students need opportunities to view themselves as sources of knowledge (i.e. knowledge is constructed internally), which leads to development of a higher level of cognitive processing.

Keywords

College; Epistemology; Implications; Personal; Stress; Students

Controlled Subject

Health education; Educational psychology; Clinical psychology

File Format

pdf

File Size

1710.08 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/i0yr-kzuh


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