Award Date

1-1-2002

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Political Science

First Committee Member

Michael Bowers

Number of Pages

78

Abstract

One of the most controversial and evolving rights recognized within recent years has been the right to privacy. During the twentieth century, the Supreme Court and the United States Congress recognized the existence of this right, although in limited aspects. In the twenty-first century, Americans' privacy rights have clashed with the evolution and the use of the Internet. Complications between a person's privacy and the information needed for national security interests arose. The following study examines the question of where the privacy of an individual in this new era ends and where government intrusion begins. Through a qualitative analysis, constitutional and legislative aspects will be brought forth to challenge the idea that self-regulation is feasible within the growing cyber nation. Final analysis will bring forward new policy proposals to counter current problems in this virtual world.

Keywords

Constitutional Legislative; Privacy; Review

Controlled Subject

Political science; Information science

File Format

pdf

File Size

1986.56 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/n3e3-oc1m


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