Award Date

1-1-2002

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Curriculum and Instruction

First Committee Member

Steven G. McCafferty

Number of Pages

70

Abstract

This study explored the relationships among reading anxiety, incidental vocabulary acquisition and culturally relevant texts. Thirty adult ESL students, 16 of Mexican origin and 14 of Chinese origin, completed modified forms of the Foreign Language Reading Anxiety Survey, vocabulary tests assessed on the Vocabulary Knowledge Scale, and an interview that solicited their opinions regarding reading anxiety remedies and the importance of cultural relevance in reaDing Results revealed a significant negative correlation between reading anxiety and performance on vocabulary tests, but not achievement, i.e. vocabulary gain. Out of six variables considered, reading anxiety was the primary predictor of performance, and cultural relevance was the only predictor of achievement. Discussion includes suggestions for practical application of results for participants of both Mexican and Chinese origin, as well as recommendations for future research that must address the specific needs of these two ethnic groups.

Keywords

Acquisitions; Anxiety; Culturally; Effects; Exempt; Incidental; Reading; Relevant Texts; Vocabulary

Controlled Subject

Curriculum planning; Linguistics; Language arts; Adult education; Educational psychology

File Format

pdf

File Size

1587.2 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/poxw-a6tw


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