Award Date

1-1-2002

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

First Committee Member

Marta Meana

Number of Pages

71

Abstract

Despite recommendations by health professionals and the American Cancer Society, few women perform breast self-examinations (BSE) or have clinical breast examinations (CBE) on a regular basis. The current study used self-reports from 453 college women under 30 years of age to investigate factors that may influence breast cancer screening behaviors. Examiners and non-examiners were compared on a series of variables: (1) health beliefs and practices (personal risk estimates for breast cancer, risk reduction expectancies, perceived susceptibility to breast cancer, perceived seriousness of breast cancer, perceived benefits of BSE, perceived barriers to BSE, confidence in performing BSE, general health motivation, the extent to which others influence breast cancer screening behavior, and knowledge of breast cancer and breast cancer screening practices) and (2) psychological well-being (somatic amplification, general mental health, optimism/pessimism, and social support). Results indicated that breast screening behavior is related to (1) the perception of benefits of breast cancer screening; (2) reduced perception of barriers to breast cancer screening; (3) higher risk reduction expectancies; (4) the influence of doctors and nurses, and (5) knowledge tests about breast cancer and breast cancer screening. Psychological well-being variables were not related to screening behavior.

Keywords

Behavior; Beliefs; Breast; Cancer; College; Screening; Women

Controlled Subject

Behaviorism (Psychology); Public health; Women's studies

File Format

pdf

File Size

1617.92 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/648x-xjo1


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