Award Date

1-1-2002

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Sociology

First Committee Member

Robert Futrell

Number of Pages

140

Abstract

This thesis examines power and political processes involved in the decision to construct a second commercial airport for Las Vegas, NV and the southern Nevada region. Using interview data and document analysis I argue that the organizational capacity of the state and its relative autonomy enabled state actors to dominate the airport's development process by defining the need and setting the agenda for the project. Additionally, state officials acquired the land for the project by circumventing established mechanisms for public participation and involvement. The findings support a state-centered approach to understanding who wields power and how in political processes. Ultimately, the case raises issues about the state's efforts to quell conflict by thwarting democratic involvement of citizens in this highly significant land development decision.

Keywords

Airport; Case; Nevada; Political; Power; Process

Controlled Subject

Social structure; Public policy

File Format

pdf

File Size

3194.88 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/4iv4-5kvy


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