Award Date

1-1-2002

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

History

First Committee Member

Hal K. Rothman

Number of Pages

239

Abstract

The Mojave National Preserve, a unit of the National Park Service, was created in 1994 in southeastern California. Its 1.6 million acres were used historically for extractive industries such as mining and ranching, and its recent history was shaped by the land's proximity to urban Los Angeles. The preserve was the fruit of a long political battle between environmental activists and conservative opponents, and the park's final administrative form and subsequent management was indelibly altered by the compromises made during the legislative fight. The park's subsequent history, including innovative planning efforts, a 1995 attempt by opponents to eliminate the preserve's budget, and day to day management of Mojave's extensive resources, highlight the unique features and history of the area, as well as the flexible institutional culture forged in the park's early struggle for survival.

Keywords

Administrative; California; History; Mojave; National; Neglected; Preserve; Protected; Space; Waste

Controlled Subject

History, Modern; Environmental sciences

File Format

pdf

File Size

6932.48 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/1i6i-cex6


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