Award Date

1-1-2002

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Chemistry

First Committee Member

Vernon Hodge

Number of Pages

132

Abstract

The Clark County Department of Air Quality Management and the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles funded a one-year study of visibility trends in Las Vegas. The Desert Research Institute conducted this study from July 2000 to July 2001. The monitoring sites for this study were chosen to represent three areas in Las Vegas, urban, suburban and background/transport. Strong diurnal patterns were found at the urban and suburban sites. The background site had low levels of air pollution, and most of the haze at this site was due to light scattering by particles. The suburban site followed a well-defined diurnal pattern during the cold season, and showed the influences of local activities (such as road construction) during the study. Overall, the urban site had the highest levels of visibility impairment, but during midday the visibility at this site improved and was comparable to that of the suburban site. This thesis presents the data from this study.

Keywords

July; Las Vegas; Nevada; Patterns; Spatial; Temporal; Vegas; Visibility

Controlled Subject

Atmospheric physics; Environmental sciences

File Format

pdf

File Size

3450.88 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/osz4-uzmc


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