Award Date

1-1-2002

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

English

First Committee Member

Beth Rosenberg

Number of Pages

64

Abstract

This thesis considers the impact of classical antiquity on the literary aesthetic of Virginia Woolf by focusing on the educational and theoretical assumptions that allowed Woolf to create her most experimental work, The Waves. Inspired by her brother Thoby Stephen and her tutor Janet Case, Woolf enjoyed a very strong and fertile relationship with the writers of antiquity, and she continued to return to them throughout her life for both conceptual and structural models. In her essays on the Greeks in particular, Woolf praises the ancients for achieving those things that she so longs to see accomplished in the works of the Moderns, especially their true representation of character and their exploration of the psychological. Her appropriation of Greek drama, Greek and Latin philosophy, and Latin neoteric poetry in The Waves, however, suggests more than mere appreciation. Woolf also clearly valued them as instruments for realizing her own aesthetic vision.

Keywords

Antiquity; Appropriation; Nightingale Sings; Virginia; Waves; Woolf

Controlled Subject

Literature, Modern; Comparative literature; British literature; English literature--Irish authors; Irish literature

File Format

pdf

File Size

1792 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/wgu6-ygq5


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