Award Date

1-1-2002

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Economics

First Committee Member

Mary Riddel

Number of Pages

44

Abstract

This study explores the economic relationships between women's schooling, fertility rates, and contraceptive use in Tanzania where population growth and fertility rates are among the highest in the world and aggravate the already ailing economy. Two models are used: fertility and contraceptive use. The study surveys women ages 15 to 49 drawing on 1996 data from the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS). The study finds that women's schooling and other socioeconomic variables are important factors in explaining reproductive behavior. The fertility model indicates that education levels are consistently associated with lower fertility rates, while the contraceptive use model indicates that education is positively associated with contraceptive use. Overall, the findings stress the key role of women's education in reducing their desire for large family by improving their economic opportunities and the market value of their time.

Keywords

Analysis; Case; Contraceptive; Countries; Developing; Economic; Fertility Schooling; Study; Tanzania; Women

Controlled Subject

Economics; Women's studies; Obstetrics

File Format

pdf

File Size

1064.96 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/i3y1-ikzc


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