Award Date

1-1-2003

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

First Committee Member

Christopher L. Heavey

Number of Pages

63

Abstract

This study explored the association between cognitive style and depression. Phase I: 195 participants completed questionnaires that assessed cognitive style and psychological distress. Among these participants the expected relationships were found between depression, anxiety, interpersonal sensitivity, attributional style, and rumination; Phase II: Six participants selected based on their attributional style engaged in Descriptive Experience Sampling, which entails wearing a small device that will beep at random intervals, recording their awareness at the sound of the beep, and being interviewed within twenty-four hours of doing so. The inner experiences revealed by DES did not generally show the patterns suggested by current theories of depression. Two individuals who appeared to be at greatest risk for depression, one of whom was in the low risk group based on the Phase I screening data, did show signs of more negatively valenced inner experience and more thoughts consistent with Beck's cognitive theory of depression.

Keywords

Attributional; Descriptive; Experience; Exploration; Methods; Sampling; Style

Controlled Subject

Clinical psychology

File Format

pdf

File Size

3901.44 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

If you are the rightful copyright holder of this dissertation or thesis and wish to have the full text removed from Digital Scholarship@UNLV, please submit a request to digitalscholarship@unlv.edu and include clear identification of the work, preferably with URL.

Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/i0al-7zse


Share

COinS