Award Date

1-1-2003

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Chemistry

First Committee Member

Dennis W. Lindle

Number of Pages

103

Abstract

The x-ray emission spectrometer was designed to observe the polarization of x-ray fluorescence resulting from the excitation of a sample by synchrotron radiation. The incident photons are intense, monoenergetic and linearly polarized along the plane of the storage-ring orbit. The emission spectrometer records the entire K-alpha spectrum by dispersing the emitted radiation with a curved Si (111) crystal and detecting the resulting radiation with a resistive anode position sensitive detector; both of which are situated on a Rowland circle. A sample is fixed in position and located in the middle of the Rowland circle. The spectrometer can be positioned to detect fluorescence emitted at 0° and 90° with respect to the polarization/propagation direction of the incident x-rays. In KCl, there was no observable polarization dependence of the emission spectra at the chlorine edge and a large effect seen in potassium below the ionization threshold. There were also small effects seen in freon-13 when excitations were to Rydberg states.

Keywords

Chlorine; Design; Emission; Kalpha; Performance; Polarized; Potassium; Ray; Spectra; Spectrometer

Controlled Subject

Chemistry, Physical and theoretical; Chemistry, Analytic

File Format

pdf

File Size

2365.44 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/fqe4-ikzi


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