Award Date

1-1-2004

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

First Committee Member

Richard McCorkle

Number of Pages

101

Abstract

Hiring standards in most police agencies result in most officer candidates having little, if any, meaningful exposure to the "oppositional" culture of the urban, minority poor. Given the current popularity of the Community Oriented Policing paradigm---with its emphasis on positive police/community relations---current police hiring and training practices handicap police agencies in their efforts to gain the trust of urban, minority communities. A content analysis of United States Department of Justice Civil Rights Division investigations under the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (42 U.S.C. 14141) was found to support the hypothesis that the interface between the police and urban males is problematic and that cultural training was identified as a training inadequacy in police departments, both large and small.

Keywords

Case; Clash; Cultural; Culture; Making; Paradigm; Police; Training

Controlled Subject

Criminology; Ethnology--Study and teaching; Public policy; Education, bilingual

File Format

pdf

File Size

4.00 MB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

If you are the rightful copyright holder of this dissertation or thesis and wish to have the full text removed from Digital Scholarship@UNLV, please submit a request to digitalscholarship@unlv.edu and include clear identification of the work, preferably with URL.


Share

COinS