Award Date

1-1-2004

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Ethics and Policy Studies

First Committee Member

Craig Walton

Number of Pages

135

Abstract

Since 1987, the valuing and managing of diversity has been on the radar screens of most human resources managers. Specifically, many are wrestling with how to establish the "perfect" diversity program that serves to get the message out to their organizational members that individual differences should be viewed as resources for learning and understanding and not barriers to career success or opportunity. However, for the majority, this has proved a difficult task. Simply, human resources managers are missing the mark when it comes to identifying a solid foundation for diversity management---a foundation that will compel organizational stakeholders to recognize diversity as a legitimate business imperative. Hence, in this examination of the origins, current state, and ethical "misses" of diversity management, an argument is made that the use of Title VII and its affirmative action mandates in diversity discourse will serve to legitimize program protocols and forward organizational acceptance.

Keywords

Action; Affirmative; Diversity; Human; Legitimacy; Managers; Programs; Resources; Utilize

Controlled Subject

Business education; Law; Management; Education, bilingual

File Format

pdf

File Size

4003.84 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/duit-ayml


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