Award Date

1-1-2004

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

History

First Committee Member

David Tanenhaus

Number of Pages

174

Abstract

On November 4, 1924, the voters of Nevada amended the state constitution to bar foreigners from owning land. A mere twenty-two votes decided the outcome of the election. This was the first step toward the passage of an ineligible alien land law that would have prevented land ownership by Japanese or persons of any other nationality deemed ineligible for United States citizenship by Congress. For reasons not completely understood, Nevada's lawmakers never passed further anti-Japanese legislation. This study examines Japanese immigration and the growth of anti-Japanese agitation across the American West, and specifically in California, between 1885 and 1924 in order to understand how this influenced the decision of the Nevada Legislature to try to institute racially discriminatory legislation.

Keywords

Alien; Asians; Ineligible; Land; Laws; Nevada; Odd; Peril; Response Western; Yellow

Controlled Subject

Ethnology--Study and teaching

File Format

pdf

File Size

4628.48 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/jn5r-hiz9


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