Award Date

1-1-2004

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

History

First Committee Member

Joseph A. Fry

Number of Pages

127

Abstract

This paper examines congressional surrender through the passage of the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution and how Congress attempted to regain its co-equal powers of war through the end of the Vietnam War by restricting funds to Southeast Asia and by the passage of the War Powers Act. The thesis also explores the intentions of the Founder's on separating the "sword" from the "purse" into two separate branches, and how the escalation of the Cold War led the U.S. into Vietnam. Finally, the paper concluded that the passage of the War Powers Act was unnecessary and unconstitutional because it granted power to the executive not delegated in the Constitution. It also concluded that the debate over the war powers of Congress and the President are still alive today because of past precedents and judicial decisions.

Keywords

Act; Congress; Failed; Gulf; Potential; Powers; Resolution Tonkin; War

Controlled Subject

United States; History; Vietnam War (1961-1975); 1961-1975; War and emergency powers

File Format

pdf

File Size

2754.56 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

If you are the rightful copyright holder of this dissertation or thesis and wish to have the full text removed from Digital Scholarship@UNLV, please submit a request to digitalscholarship@unlv.edu and include clear identification of the work, preferably with URL.

Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/p8kc-xv3s


Share

COinS