Award Date

1-1-2004

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Communication Studies

First Committee Member

Thomas R. Burkholder

Number of Pages

112

Abstract

The tremendous influence of Wovoka, or Jack Wilson as he was commonly known, was manifested through his message of peace and renewal. The Ghost Dance Prophet of 1890 outlined a new way of life for "his people" which included every native nation, not just the Paiute. Delegations that came to hear Wovoka speak and letters he sent to the faithful spread the tenets of the religion among the indigenous people. Wovoka's rhetorical history illustrates the interplay of first persona, substantive message, and second persona as a means of transforming an audience. In addition, the parallels between the Paiute Prophet's discourse and the prophets that preceded him, both Native American and Christian demonstrate the authoritative power derived from positioning oneself as the mouthpiece of God.

Keywords

Dance; Discourse; Ghost; History; Power; Prophet; Prophetic; Reconstitutive; Rhetorical; Wovoka; Jack Wilson

Controlled Subject

Rhetoric; Religious history; Biography

File Format

pdf

File Size

1740.8 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/1k0p-qr9j


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