Award Date

1-1-2004

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Political Science

First Committee Member

Jonathan R. Strand

Number of Pages

83

Abstract

This study tests the assumption that borrowing from the World Bank, specifically the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) and the International Development Association (IDA), promotes economic development. The focus of this study is the poorest region in the world today, Sub-Saharan Africa, for the 25 year time period of 1974--1999. Other hypothesized influences on wealth include human capital, debt, aid, foreign direct investment, savings, regime, and population. Two models include 36 countries in the data set and estimate the coefficients using generalized least squares regression. Two additional models use a data set that is complete for 27 countries and estimate the coefficients with Prais-Winsten regression using panel-corrected standard errors. The results suggest there is not a significant impact of World Bank lending on a country's level of wealth. The implications of this research deal with the effectiveness of development policies of international institutions in this region.

Keywords

Africa; Bank; Development; Effectiveness; Lending; Measuring; Programs; Saharan; World

Controlled Subject

International law; Economics

File Format

pdf

File Size

2119.68 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/b7qe-fga9


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