Award Date

1-1-2005

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Political Science

First Committee Member

David Damore

Number of Pages

79

Abstract

The prevailing theoretical approach in political science has been to analyze presidential coattails from a top down perspective focusing on the effect that presidential elections have on congressional outcomes. Presidential coattail research has been limited in scope to coattails as a one-way causation often examining variables in isolation, rarely accounting for the complex nature of elections and competing forces that influence elections across various levels of campaigns. This research seeks to present a more realistic view of campaign processes by assessing the spillover effects that campaign activity for one race may have on other races occurring simultaneously. Specifically, this thesis considers the factors that shape the context in which presidential and senatorial campaigns are occurring. This thesis builds upon prior research to offer a state-level analysis of Senate elections and analyze the upward impact Senate elections may have on the vote for President.

Keywords

Changing; Coattails; Dynamic; Elections; Senate

Controlled Subject

Political science

File Format

pdf

File Size

1863.68 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/h2pn-1f40


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