Award Date

1-1-2005

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

First Committee Member

Christopher A. Kearney

Number of Pages

156

Abstract

Symptoms associated with the development and maintenance of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) were examined in a diverse group of maltreated adolescents. The first hypothesis was that levels of PTSD symptomatology, depression, dissociation, anger, and maladaptive cognitions were expected to significantly differ among African-American, Caucasian, Hispanic, and Multiracial adolescents. The second hypothesis was that ethnicity was expected to significantly moderate a relationship between (1) severity of PTSD as measured by symptomatology, and (2) the expression of related symptoms (i.e., depression, dissociation, anger, and maladaptive cognitions). Regarding hypothesis one, African-Americans reported less depressive symptoms overall than other ethnic groups, with Caucasians and Hispanics appearing fairly similar, and Multiracial individuals reporting the most symptoms. African-American and Multiracial ethnic statuses were moderators in the relationship between PTSD and depression. Assessment and clinical recommendations pertaining to trauma in diverse youths were provided.

Keywords

Differences; Disorder; Ethnic; Maltreated; Posttraumatic; Related; Respect; Stress; Symptoms; Youths

Controlled Subject

Clinical psychology

File Format

pdf

File Size

3942.4 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/73wk-hisw


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