Award Date

1-1-2005

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

First Committee Member

Douglas P. Ferraro

Number of Pages

116

Abstract

Recent increases in violence rates among female juveniles, especially African Americans and Hispanics, have necessitated an investigation of contributors to violence. The present study examines differential aspects of peer relationships as predictors of violence among female juvenile offenders, taking racial/ethnic differences into account. Questionnaires assessing for peer relationship variables (i.e., attachment, perceptions of delinquency, involvement in peer pressure, and association with delinquent peers) and delinquent and violent behavior were administered to 136 female juvenile offenders. The results showed that high levels of peer association and extrinsic rewards from peer relationships best predicted violence among female juvenile offenders. Among Caucasians, African Americans, and Hispanics, separate dimensions of peer relationships differentially predicted violent behavior.

Keywords

Delinquents; Differences; Ethnic; Females; Peer; Racial; Relations; Study; Violence

Controlled Subject

Clinical psychology

File Format

pdf

File Size

2488.32 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/vwcx-tym6


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