Award Date

1-1-2005

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Economics

First Committee Member

Thomas Carroll

Number of Pages

45

Abstract

A well-known characteristic of Hispanic in the U.S. is their tendency to concentrate their settlement area in distinct locations. This study merges aggregate data of localities with micro observations to estimate the joint decisions of residential location and homeownership choice for Hispanics. To address the possibility that the disturbances in the regression may be correlated within groups, we apply a bivarite probit framework clustered by localities (PUMAs), using the Public Use Micro Statistics of Census 2000 data for Nevada. The results suggests that Hispanics choose to live in Hispanic enclaves are characterized by lower income, less English fluency, lower educational attainments and recent migration. Assessing the interaction of the homeownership decisions and location choice, we find that these two residential decisions are simultaneously determined and they have significantly positive effects on each other.

Keywords

Choices; Hispanic; Neighborhoods; Nevada; Residence

Controlled Subject

Economics; Ethnology--Study and teaching

File Format

pdf

File Size

1085.44 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/3wni-xi9t


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