Award Date

1-1-2005

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

History

First Committee Member

David Wrobel

Number of Pages

164

Abstract

Tabernacles are a largely overlooked feature of communities in the Mormon Culture Region. Though the tabernacle on Temple Square in Salt Lake City has world-wide recognition, very little has been written about the other 78 that the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints built between 1847 and 1953. This thesis discusses the religious, cultural, and social motivations behind the planning and construction of tabernacles, as evidenced by developments such as the Plat of the City of Zion and the Priesthood Reorganization of 1877, as well as the numerous uses of these buildings. The significance of the buildings in the development of communities is investigated using an interdisciplinary approach, utilizing the work of historians, geographers, and sociologists. The study also addresses why tabernacles are no longer built and the significance that they have in the communities where they still stand.

Keywords

Building; Center; Culture; Day; Latter; Mormon; Region; Saint; Tabernacles; Utah

Controlled Subject

Church; History of doctrines; Geography

File Format

pdf

File Size

7905.28 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/17k1-zull


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