Award Date

1-1-2005

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Political Science

First Committee Member

Jerry L. Simich

Number of Pages

107

Abstract

This thesis demonstrates the value of the 'hegemonic' theory of politics as a basis for the discussion of the importance of commercially popular music in the political socialization process. The theoretical foundations of popular music studies are considered, the existing literature on popular soul music is reviewed, and an analysis of the lyrics of primarily popular soul songs from 1965 to 1975 is presented. The content analysis suggests that the conception of the black man as described by the whites served a hegemonic function in the culture of African-Americans. However, popular soul music lyrics of the 1960s and 1970s vocalized in opposition to this dominant belief system, celebrating the culture of African-Americans through themes of freedom, pride, and power.

Keywords

Music; Politics; Shakedown; Soul

Controlled Subject

Political science; Ethnology--Study and teaching; Music

File Format

pdf

File Size

2447.36 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/9hmc-nb38


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