Award Date

1-1-1992

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Economics

Number of Pages

53

Abstract

This paper examines the influence of six personal and human capital characteristics on incomes of college graduates in five different business occupational categories. The characteristics studied are age, race, sex, marital status, bachelors or advanced degree, and employment in the private or public sector. The influence of these characteristics are examined in the fields of management, marketing, accounting, banking, and economics; A theoretical earnings model is constructed and tested using regression analysis of annual earnings against the above characteristics. Separate regressions are applied to each of the five occupational categories. The results are then compared across categories to demonstrate the varying income effects of personal attributes in each profession; Age-earnings profiles are shown for each occupation, and representative starting salaries are estimated. The thesis concludes with a discussion of how college graduates can employ the data when choosing a career path.

Keywords

Business; Careers; College; Compensation; Entering; Estimating; Graduates; Models

Controlled Subject

Labor economics; Commerce; Economics

File Format

pdf

File Size

1546.24 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/rbd2-qjc3


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