Award Date

1-1-2006

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Life Sciences

First Committee Member

Brett R. Riddle

Number of Pages

60

Abstract

Study of Neotropical avian biodiversity have generally been focused on South American taxa. As a result, the contribution of Central America to overall Neotropical diversity remains under-studied. The Great American Interchange (GAI) between North and South America is a biogeographic event known to impact biodiversity throughout the Neotropics, linking the evolutionary history of these land masses. Here I show that genetic diversity in the well-known and widespread Neotropical avian genus Trogon greatly exceeds previously recognized biodiversity in this group. Results also invoke a Central American center of origin for the genus, with multiple independent dispersals into and subsequent diversification within South America. This has created non-monophyly in the current taxonomy, which has been masked by the use of misleading plumage characters in historical classification of the genus. Recovered patterns can be used in comparative studies with other Neotropical groups, providing insights into the evolutionary past of this diversity rich region.

Keywords

Avian; Diversification; Exploring; Genus; Molecular; Neotropical; Patterns; Phylogenetics; Trogon; Widespread

Controlled Subject

Zoology; Ecology

File Format

pdf

File Size

1423.36 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/p3ej-ymii


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