Award Date

1-1-2006

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

History

First Committee Member

Sue Fawn Chung

Number of Pages

204

Abstract

This study sheds light on the contributions of American Protestant missionaries in parlaying their experiences gleaned from overseas Chinese assignments in establishing domestic mission programs in America aimed at "saving" Chinese girls. In doing so, female missionaries built institutions and launched social programs that used the mui tsai (Chinese domestic servants), their experiences, and their transformation from "heathen to Christian" as a material representation of the success and necessity of domestic and overseas Chinese missionary ventures. In doing so, missionary women constructed national and transnational networks armed with the goal of maximizing their missions and Christianizing China. Although this study primarily analyzes Presbyterian and Methodist Episcopalian female-operated organizations, in the city of San Francisco---there is no question that many Protestant denominations followed the same pattern in countless American cities from 1870 to 1920.

Keywords

Material; Maximize; Missionaries; Mission; Mui Representation; TSAI; Chinese; Episcopalian; Presbyterian; Christianizing; Evangelizing; China

Controlled Subject

Religion

File Format

pdf

File Size

6338.56 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/1qcf-bwnx


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