Award Date

1-1-2006

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

History

First Committee Member

Joseph A. Fry

Number of Pages

138

Abstract

This thesis explores the struggle for political, social, and labor rights waged by the Mexican and Mexican-American people in the Pacific Northwest. Drawing on earlier histories, social studies, census materials, interviews and newspapers articles spanning the twentieth century, the paper locates the roots of the community in the early twentieth century and details the organizing activities of farm workers, the direct political action of students, and the efforts of the whole community to attain political representation, economic power, and some measure of hard earned dignity. This study is equal parts political history, social history, and labor history, ultimately indicting an exploitive agricultural system in Oregon and Washington, one that has impeded every effort to improve the lives of Mexican immigrants, farm workers, and the community in general.

Keywords

American; Dignity; Mexican; Northwest; Pacific; Struggle

Controlled Subject

Hispanic Americans--Study

File Format

pdf

File Size

3635.2 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/4kwz-x12w


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