Award Date

1-1-2006

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Criminal Justice

First Committee Member

William Sousa

Number of Pages

47

Abstract

Racial profiling remains the subject of controversy when discussing police and minority relationships. Recently, scholars have studied this controversial issue in an attempt to determine the characteristics and extent of the problem. Although researchers have suggested possible reasons for racial disparities in traffic stop data, more information is needed to develop a more in-depth understanding of these disparities. The study presented here analyzes traffic stop data from Las Vegas during the 2002 calendar year. The study analyzes key driver characteristics and whether these characteristics influence the officer's search or arrest of the driver. The study uses univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analyses. The study finds limited support for the differential enforcement theory, although variables not available to the analyses may mitigate this result. Policy implications of the research findings are discussed.

Keywords

Data; Las Vegas; Nevada; Police; Profiling; Racial; Reexamination; Stop; Vegas

Controlled Subject

Criminology; Ethnology--Study and teaching

File Format

pdf

File Size

1443.84 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/bpe8-crk5


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