Award Date

1-1-2008

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Life Sciences

First Committee Member

Michelle Elekonich

Number of Pages

51

Abstract

Despite large-scale propagation and rearing efforts few of the critically endangered bonytail, Gila elegans, are recovered following release from hatcheries. This study tested the role of passive integrative transponder (PIT) tag loss and tagging associated stress and mortality in these low recoveries. Bonytail exhibited 98-100 percent tag retention regardless of insertion direction (ventral toward anterior and anterior toward ventral). Plasma cortisol levels were measured at 0, 0.5, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours following PIT-tagging in fish held at three temperatures (12, 16, and 20°C) as an indicator of stress. Bonytail tagged at 16°C had significantly lower plasma cortisol levels than those of fish tagged at 12°C and 20°C. At all three temperatures cortisol levels returned to baseline with in 24 hours. Mortality associated with PIT-tagging was only observed at 20°C. These data suggest that PIT tag handling for bonytail should occur at 16°C.

Keywords

Elegans; Gila; Integrated; Location; Mortality; Passive; Retention; Stress; Transponders

Controlled Subject

Physiology

File Format

pdf

File Size

808.96 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/ntw1-z1mi


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