Award Date

1-1-2002

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Sociology

First Committee Member

Fred Preston

Number of Pages

265

Abstract

Long before medical and psychological experts determined that problem gambling qualified as a mental illness, moral experts determined that this problem could be "diagnosed" as a sin. This research examines pre-1915 gambling literature to determine the ways in which people who gambled too much were identified, named, and "treated" socially. Interestingly, virtually all of our current diagnostic criteria were identified by moral thinkers hundreds of years ago. Implications for the sociological history of problem gambling, the sociology of mental illness, and the sociology of religion and morality are discussed.

Keywords

Gambler; Gambling; History; Mental Illness; Problems; Problem Gamblers; Problem Gambler; Sickness; Sin; Sociological

Controlled Subject

Public policy; Mental health; History, Modern

File Format

pdf

File Size

6901.76 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/ur1u-b94t


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