Award Date

1-1-2002

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Leadership

First Committee Member

Paul Meacham

Number of Pages

126

Abstract

The purpose of this dissertation was to examine variations of teaching and assessment strategies based on status and education level of faculty members at the Community College of Southern Nevada (CCSN) and the Truckee Meadows Community College (TMCC). To facilitate this study, a survey instrument was developed and distributed to 400 randomly selected faculty members employed at CCSN and TMCC, with an overall response rate of 45.8%; Adjunct and nondoctorate instructors focused significantly more on lectures than their full-time and doctorate colleagues. Full-time instructors, however, placed significantly more emphasis on class discussion, slide/powerpoint presentation, lab teaching, and distance learning compared to adjunct instructors. Full-time instructors placed significantly more emphasis on attendance/participation, quizzes, lab practicals, and research assignments, while placing significantly less emphasis on multiple-choice exams compared to adjunct instructors. Doctorate instructors focused significantly more on lab practicals than their nondoctorate colleagues. Adjunct instructors emphasized significantly more on recall of facts, critical thinking, integration of ideas, and application of theories than their full-time colleagues; Recommendations based on survey results included participation in faculty workshops for teaching and technology enhancement, greater access to multimedia equipment for adjunct instructors, and more utilization of multimedia equipment as part of teaching tools for all instructors.

Keywords

Assessment; Colleges; Community; Community College; Community Colleges; Instructors; Nevada; Practices; Public; Teaching

Controlled Subject

Community colleges; Curriculum planning

File Format

pdf

File Size

2222.08 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/5wjr-ee4m


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