Award Date

1-1-2004

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Hotel Administration

First Committee Member

Cheri A. Young

Number of Pages

277

Abstract

The career progression of Hispanic employees has received limited attention in organizational and counseling psychology research and no studies examined the special circumstances relevant to Hispanic immigrants. Additional career-related research with Hispanic immigrants is therefore necessary, and has been called for by specialists in the field (Arbona, 1995; Brown, 2002; Lent & Worthington, 1999; Leong & Brown, 1995; Super, 1991). Studying career progression of this group would enhance our knowledge regarding the ways in which cultural values and the overall "immigrant" experiences influence their desire for and actual pursuit of upward mobility. My study examined the barriers and motivators to career progression among Hispanic immigrant workers in the Las Vegas hospitality industry. As this was an exploratory study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with seventeen Mexican immigrant hotel employees. Findings identify two main groups of variables influencing career progression among Hispanic immigrants: Individual and environmental variables. Individual variables include human capital, self-concept, ethnic identity, cultural values and stress. Environmental variables include the local job market, the organizational culture and climate, and the characteristics of the job itself. This study proposes a model explaining career progression among Hispanic immigrants and offers some recommendations for human resources professional to increase upward mobility within this employee group.

Keywords

Barriers; Bubble; Bursting; Cultural Values; Environmental; Ethnic Identity; Immigrants; Individuals; Inside; Mexican; Mobility; Upward; Upward Mobility

Controlled Subject

Management; Ethnology--Study and teaching

File Format

pdf

File Size

6420.48 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/tb7q-fb0j


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