Award Date

1-1-2005

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Curriculum and Instruction

First Committee Member

Martha Young

Number of Pages

175

Abstract

Many school reformers endorse collaborative learning communities among educators since the mid 1980's to improve schools. Learning communities strengthen the school's culture of learning. Collaborative literacy learning communities focus on collaboration about literacy learning among teachers as well as the acceptance and exchange of literacy learning leadership roles by the literacy specialist and classroom teachers. This research investigates the three schools' culture of learning. Each school reflects a different culture of learning (i.e. highly collaborative, moderately collaborative, and non-collaborative). This study reveals reciprocity in learning and learning leadership and support from learning leaders maintain powerful communities of learning. Negative influences of the school's traditional culture of learning and threats to teachers' self-efficacy in their craft constrain collaborative learning and learning leadership roles. Recommendations are made for further research to support teachers' collaborative learning and learning leadership in Title I schools.

Keywords

Collaborative; Collaborative Literacy; Communities; Collaborative Literacy Learning; Learning Communities; Literacy; School; Teach; Title I

Controlled Subject

Curriculum planning

File Format

pdf

File Size

3522.56 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/9ivh-sj8r


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