Award Date

1-1-2008

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

First Committee Member

Cheryl Bowles

Number of Pages

134

Abstract

Now more than ever, nurses need to be leaders. However, most studies of leadership, whether in nursing, business, or the military, have focused on individuals in administrative positions. School nurses practice in primarily autonomous circumstances, where they need to possess substantial leadership skills and the ability to identify and manage emotions to ensure an optimal educational learning environment for the students under their care; Three leadership theories were combined to form the Emotionally Intelligent Leadership Model as the framework for a leadership training program. This two group before and after quasi-experimental study investigated the effects of a leadership training program on the emotional intelligence and perceptions of leadership skills of school nurses; A sample of 60 school nurses in Southern Nevada were recruited and randomly assigned to either the control or experimental group. The experimental group received a leadership training program totaling 18 hours. The following hypotheses were tested: (1) School nurses who receive leadership training will show significantly higher overall emotional intelligence scores as measured on the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) than school nurses who do not receive the leadership training. (2) School nurses who receive leadership training will show significantly higher overall scores as measured on the Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI) than school nurses who do not receive the leadership training. (3) School nurses who receive leadership training will show significantly higher overall scores as measured on the Grossman and Valiga Leadership Characteristics and Skills Assessment (GVLA) than school nurses who do not receive the leadership training. (4) School nurses who receive leadership training will show significantly higher overall scores as measured on the Grossman and Valiga Leadership Skills: Rate Yourself Questionnaire (GVQ) than school nurses who do not receive the leadership training; Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and both parametric and nonparametric analyses. The data demonstrated that the leadership training did significantly impact the experimental group's self perception of leadership as measured by the LPI. The training did not, however, have a significant impact on their emotional intelligence as measured by the MSCEIT.

Keywords

Emotional; Emotional Intelligence; Intelligence; Leadership; Leadership Training; Nurses; School; School Nurses; Training

Controlled Subject

Nursing

File Format

pdf

File Size

1.87 MB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

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