Award Date

1-1-1977

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Secondary Education

Number of Pages

150

Abstract

An attempt was made to investigate two strategies for implementing a self-administered parental advice procedure for training and maintaining responsibilities among family members. The population included 14 families from Las Vegas, Nevada who were seeking to solve common child-rearing problems. Families were divided into two groups: Contact approach and No-Contact approach. Contact approach parents received one hour of professional assistance per week. The No-Contact approach parents self-administered the Children's Activity Planner in their homes. No significant pretest differences existed between groups. Research indicates that few self-administered programs exist for in-home resolution of common child-rearing problems. The Children's Activity Planner was developed by the author. It consisted of: (1) parents' handbook, (2) children's progress chart, and (3) responsibility and privilege labels. Two hypotheses were considered. Firstly, that the No-Contact approach parents would show no significant differences from the Contact approach parents in their positive or negative perceptions of their children before and after the use of the Children's Activity Planner program. Secondly, that the No-Contact approach parents would show no significant difference from the Contact approach parents in their positive or negative ratings of satisfaction after the use of the Children's Activity Planner Program. A t-test was used to test for significant differences on posttest scores for the Parent Survey and the Louisville Behavior Checklist. Results indicated no significant differences between groups on any scales of both the Parent Survey and the Louisville Behavior Checklist. Similar results were obtained applying the t-test to the Program Evaluation data for both groups. Again no significant differences between groups were obtained on the posttest. The results suggest that the self-administered Children's Activity Planner was equally as effective as the Children's Activity Planner used with professional assistance. Furthermore, parents were equally as satisfied with the Children's Activity Planner regardless of whether it was self-administered or used with professional assistance. Two alternative hypotheses were discussed: (1) sample size, and (2) pretest treatment interaction. Future investigations should consider using a wide variety of measures combined with the specifity of parent in-home data and direct observation.

Keywords

Administered; Advice; Analysis; Family; Implementing; Maintaining; Members; Parent; Procedure; Responsibilities; Self; Strategies; Training; Two

Controlled Subject

Special education

File Format

pdf

File Size

5918.72 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/e3lb-34l7


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