Award Date

1-1-1980

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Educational Administration and Higher Education

Number of Pages

163

Abstract

A research project was undertaken to develop a casino degree curriculum model for two-year colleges. The study began with an overview of the gambling industry and the advent of gaming curricula at various institutions of higher learning; The casino model was developed using Bloom's Taxonomy for course structure and Kalani's Model for curricular framework. Additional studies were conducted on curriculum development methods, and various other curriculum designs and models; The research design included data from two questionnaires and one personal interview instrument. Further data was provided by gaming employment statistics, gaming revenue statistics, and proprietary gaming school programs. This data was used to develop a proposed Casino Curriculum Model for Clark County Community College in Las Vegas. The model utilized a four-step approach to curriculum design encompassing (1) Demand Factor, (2) Selection Factor, (3) Skills and Knowledge Factor, (4) Curriculum Factor. The Demand Factor determined various gaming occupations available. The Selection Factor determined highest employment opportunities. The Skills and Knowledge Factor determined core and specialized learnings. The Curriculum Factor determined basic curricular elements. Also shown were model variations for specialized programs and a comparison between proposed and existing CCCC curriculum models; Recommendations included the development of various gaming certificates and degRees Further studies on the potential of gaming programs in other institutions and locales, and a greater vocational/technical emphasis for CCCC.

Keywords

Casino; College; Curriculum; Degree; Implementing; Model; Optimized; Two; Year

Controlled Subject

Community colleges

File Format

pdf

File Size

5642.24 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/k2bg-c0o0


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