Award Date

1-1-1991

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Curriculum and Instruction

First Committee Member

Virginia E. Usnick

Number of Pages

128

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of mathematics methods courses on the mathematical attitudes, content knowledge, and pedagogical beliefs of preservice elementary teachers and preservice secondary mathematics teachers. The study was conducted during the fall semester of 1992 at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Forty-seven preservice teachers participated voluntarily. Twenty-eight were enrolled in an elementary mathematics methods course; nineteen were enrolled in a secondary mathematics methods course; Attitudes toward mathematics were studied quantitatively by administering Aiken's Revised Attitude Scale on a pretest-posttest basis. The results indicated that the attitude toward mathematics of preservice elementary teachers improved significantly. The attitude toward mathematics of preservice secondary mathematics teachers improved, but not significantly; Mathematical content was measured quantitatively by administering a test designed to measure knowledge of meaningful mathematical content. This test was administered on a pretest-posttest basis. The results indicated that the meaningful mathematical content knowledge of preservice elementary teachers improved significantly. The meaningful mathematical content knowledge of preservice secondary mathematics teachers did not change significantly; Preservice teachers' pedagogical beliefs were studied qualitatively. Specifically, beliefs concerning the use of manipulatives, technological aids, and cooperative learning were considered. Respondents wrote about their beliefs in each of these areas at the beginning of the semester and were interviewed at the end of the semester. Analysis of the qualitative data resulted in the generation of the following four working hypotheses: (a) Mathematics methods courses provide preservice teachers with important knowledge and experience concerning the use of manipulatives, technological aids, and cooperative learning; (b) preservice teachers learn mathematical content through their experiences in the mathematics methods course which involve the use of manipulatives, technological aids, and cooperative learning; (c) preservice teachers are concerned that difficulties might arise which will impede their ability to incorporate the use of manipulatives, technological aids, and cooperative learning in their classrooms; and (d) preservice teachers leave their mathematics methods course feeling they need to learn more about the use of manipulatives, technological aids, and cooperative learning.

Keywords

Attitudes; Beliefs; Content; Courses; Effects; Knowledge; Mathematical; Mathematics; Methods; Pedagogical; Preservice; Teachers

Controlled Subject

Mathematics--Study and teaching; Curriculum planning; Teachers--Training of

File Format

pdf

File Size

4218.88 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/enmy-rgen


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