Award Date

1-1-1992

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Sociology

Number of Pages

184

Abstract

American society of the 1990's is characterized by a high degree of fragmentation, geographic mobility and general feelings of a dramatically changing social world. For various reasons, every year many people move from their birth homes, leaving behind established affiliations and networks. Consequently, they may find it difficult to develop a sense of identity of community. Today, sports, via fan association or "booster clubs," may serve as the vehicle for identity maintenance and transition into a new community. The effects of joining a sports booster group is examined by using questionnaire data from a survey conducted on members of the Southern California Browns Backers Association (SCBBA). The analysis seeks to determine how individuals establish a sense of community centered around leisure. The results of the study revealed that, for most respondents, the SCBBA provided hometown ties and thus a sense of roots, provided valuable bonding opportunities, allowed for expressions of loyalty and commitment, and helped to maintain positive feelings of identification and self-esteem.

Keywords

Boosterism; Community; Identity; Sport

Controlled Subject

Sociology; Social psychology; Recreation

File Format

pdf

File Size

5928.96 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/9h73-8co0


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