Award Date

1-1-1993

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

Number of Pages

68

Abstract

Although a large amount of research has been reported regarding the effects of stressful life events (i.e., divorce, severe illness) on children, only a small amount has addressed the measurement of daily life stressors (i.e., school, home, social activities). More specifically, the issue of parent-child agreement on childhood daily life stressors has been relatively unexamined. The present study examined 98 child, adolescent, and parent reports of childhood daily stress. Results indicated that parents underreport daily stress for their children. Specifically, fathers report lower levels of child stress, while mothers overestimate negative affectivity. Finally, younger children reported more daily stress, especially stressful events, when compared to adolescent and parental reports. Gender, daily parental time spent with the child, and family environment had little effect on parent-child agreement. Results are discussed regarding implications for assessment and treatment of childhood stress.

Keywords

Agreement; Child; Children; Daily; Evaluating; Life; Parent; Stressors

Controlled Subject

Clinical psychology; Developmental psychology

File Format

pdf

File Size

2682.88 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

If you are the rightful copyright holder of this dissertation or thesis and wish to have the full text removed from Digital Scholarship@UNLV, please submit a request to digitalscholarship@unlv.edu and include clear identification of the work, preferably with URL.

Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/k88o-cpit


Share

COinS