Award Date

1-1-1993

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Political Science

Number of Pages

166

Abstract

This thesis examines whether a governmental elite consensus exists that the nature of public corruption in the Las Vegas Valley justifies the use of federal law enforcement undercover operations. Using the elite interviewing method, the writer obtained the perceptions of twenty-four sworn public officials from the cities of Henderson, Las Vegas and North Las Vegas regarding their views of public corruption and undercover operations. The writer contends that in accordance with social contract theoretical principles, federal undercover operations are justified if a consensus of seventy-five percent of the respondents agree to their use. The research demonstrated that ninety-six percent of the respondents agree such operations should be used to investigate allegations of public corruption in the Las Vegas area.

Keywords

Corruption; Elite; Las Vegas; Nevada; Operations; Perceptions; Probing; Sting; Vegas

Controlled Subject

Political science; Criminology

File Format

pdf

File Size

5611.52 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/dbwl-7asl


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