Award Date

1-1-1997

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Sociology

First Committee Member

David R. Dickens

Second Committee Member

Donald E. Carns

Number of Pages

263

Abstract

The topic of this dissertation is visual surveillance. The research addresses two aspects of surveillance in the social world. First, how surveillance cameras oversee people and activities in social space, and second, how the individuals and technology of surveillance are organized. The introduction describes the recent proliferation of surveillance. The literature review describes what I call the six sociological tenets of visual surveillance. The methodology describes the qualitative techniques used in this research, including the issues and problems encountered in studying secret organizations. The results of interviews and interactions are presented as an ethnographic narrative that describes: a history of surveillance, surveillance practices, and surveillance organizations. The findings of this research propose an ideal-typical characterization of visual surveillance organizations.

Keywords

Cameras; Contemporary; Issues; Organizations; Secret; Secret Organizations; Sociological; Surveillance; Visual Surveillance

Controlled Subject

Social sciences--Research

File Format

pdf

File Size

6840.32 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/6wiz-ta6t


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