Award Date

1-1-1993

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

Number of Pages

59

Abstract

Early theories of social-cognitive development emphasized children's unilateral respect for rules and authority (Piaget, 1932/65). Recently, however, children have been found to make conceptual distinctions among moral, conventional, and personal events. These distinctions are hypothesized to be related to the differential judgments that 6- to 8-year-old children have been shown to make about the emotional experience of others in these types of events (Arsenio & Ford, 1985). However, it is not known if preschoolers make similar distinctions between the affect of various participants in different event-types. The judgments of preschoolers regarding the affect of participants in sociomoral events were examined. Forty-two 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds were presented with scenarios depicting different sociomoral event-types, and asked to assess the affective consequences of events for story participants. Results show that preschoolers differentiate type of affect between sociomoral events and between event participants. Potential implications are that young children are aware of the emotional consequences of events and that this knowledge plays a role in their sociomoral judgments.

Keywords

Affective; Children; Development; Information; Preschool; Role; Sociomoral

Controlled Subject

Developmental psychology

File Format

pdf

File Size

2201.6 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/pkh3-w08m


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