Award Date

1-1-1993

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Anthropology

Number of Pages

113

Abstract

Anti-Castro activists began organizing guerrilla groups in the early 1960's to oppose the revolutionary government of Cuba. The perception that the new regime posed a threat to religion and pre-existing cultural values were among the motives for this activity. This thesis presents three case studies of individuals who due to their beliefs, became guerrillas, were imprisoned for that activity, and who subsequently refused to participate in the prison reeducation program. The findings of this study indicate that ideology and beliefs function to provide meaningful explanations to social life, and are not necessarily thin veils for self interest masquerading as principle. Rather, important religious and cultural beliefs take on a life of their own independent of material self interest; this allows for individuals to commit to causes where there are powerful incentives to renounce one's beliefs.

Keywords

Belief; Cuban; History; Organization; Plantado; Political; Prisoners

Controlled Subject

Ethnology; Criminology; Political science

File Format

pdf

File Size

4720.64 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/xk2d-7l6k


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