Award Date

1-1-1996

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

Number of Pages

73

Abstract

Previous research has indicated that moderate levels of suspicion will enhance deception detection accuracy. This study hypothesized that combining state suspicion and trait suspicion (i.e. antisocial personality traits) in order to create a moderate level of suspicion overall would produce a higher detection accuracy than would be found among individuals who were not suspicious. Participants consisted of 133 UNLV undergraduates, who completed the Antisocial subscale of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II. Participants were assigned to a no suspicion or moderate suspicion condition, viewed a videotape of persons being truthful or deceptive, judged videotape actors as being truthful or untruthful, and rated their own degree of suspicion. Results did not confirm the original hypothesis, but did indicate that persons high in antisocial traits were more suspicious than those low in such traits, and subjects not primed to be suspicious made more veracity judgments than those who were primed to be suspicious.

Keywords

Accuracy; Antisocial; Deception; Detection; Effects; Personality; Suspicion; Traits

Controlled Subject

Personality; Social psychology

File Format

pdf

File Size

1669.12 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/et33-gibb


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